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Table 2 Analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) based on Bray-Curtis and Manhattan distance measures (identical results in all cases) using abundance data comparing bacterial community composition across different land uses

From: Transition of Ethiopian highland forests to agriculture-dominated landscapes shifts the soil microbial community composition

Changes with land use
Categories (LU1—LU2)
N R P OTUs detected
(Total OTUs)
Bacterial OTU (%)
LU1 LU2 Shared
Natural forest—eucalyptus 14 0.32 0.13 190 Vs. 188 (240) 52 (22) 50 (21) 138 (57)
Natural forest—exclosure 14 0.41 0.01 190 Vs. 177 (232) 55 (24) 42 (18) 135 (58)
Natural forest—grassland 14 0.51 0.04 190 Vs. 191 (241) 50 (21) 51 (21) 140 (58)
Natural forest—cropland 14 0.47 0.04 190 Vs. 206 (259) 53 (20) 69 (27) 137 (53)
Eucalyptus—exclosure 14 0.11 0.99 188 Vs. 177 (227) 51 (23) 39 (17) 137 (60)
Eucalyptus—grassland 14 0.21 0.24 188 Vs. 191 (236) 46 (20) 48 (20) 142 (60)
Eucalyptus—cropland 14 0.23 0.20 188 Vs. 206 (253) 49 (19) 66 (26) 138 (55)
Exclosure—grassland 14 0.35 0.01 177 Vs. 191 (233) 41 (18) 57 (24) 135 (58)
Exclosure—cropland 14 0.31 0.09 177 Vs. 206 (246) 42 (17) 70 (28) 134 (55)
Grassland—cropland 14 0.16 0.68 191 Vs. 206 (252) 49 (19) 62 (25) 141 (56)
  1. Percentage of OTUs detected in Land Use 1 (LU1), Land Use 2 (LU2) and shared OTUs between LU1 and LU2 are shown for pairwise comparisons. Significant factors (P < 0.05) are indicated in italic
  2. R degree of separation between test groups ranging from − 1 to 1; R 0, not different; R  1, completely different (i.e., where the R-value between 0–0.299 “no separation/overlapping”; 0.300–0.749 “different but with some overlapping”; and > 0.750 “well separated”); N = population size. P values were based on 999 permutations (significant values with Bonferroni correction (P < 0.05) are given in italic