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Table 2 Standardized regression coefficients and significance ( p ) of model variables describing body mass (log scale), straight line length (log scale), and body condition measures of springtime grizzly bear captures in Alberta, Canada

From: Environmental, biological and anthropogenic effects on grizzly bear body size: temporal and spatial considerations

Block (hypothesized) category and measurement variables Mass Length Body condition
  StD β p StD β p StD β p
1) Biology and capture effects       
  Age 1.663 <0.001 1.606 <0.001 1.898 <0.001
  Age2 -1.348 <0.001 -1.467 <0.001 -1.450 <0.001
  Adult Females (AF)      -0.367 <0.001
  Adult F w/ cubs (AFC)      -0.562 <0.001
  Male x Age 0.619 <0.001 0.570 <0.001   
  Number of captures      -0.196 0.002
  Population density       
2) Regional habitat productivity       
  March precipitation -0.255 <0.001     
  Spring (May-Jun) temperature    0.202 0.002   
  Alpine habitat use (HP) -0.226 <0.001     
3) Inter-annual climate variability       
Maternal effects (B t-1 ):       
  Summer (Jul-Aug) temperature -0.220 <0.001 0.168 0.009   
Natal effects (B t0 ):       
  Spring (May-Jun) temperature    0.149 0.038   
  Summer (May-Oct) temperature 0.154 0.013     
  Winter (Dec-Mar) precipitation 0.173 0.001     
  August precipitation -0.115 0.043     
  July precipitation      -0.248 0.002
Capture effects (C t ):       
4) Local habitat quality       
  Canopy variation (HP) -0.112 0.009     
  Regen. forest age variation (HP)      0.288 <0.001
5) Human footprint       
6) Landscape change    0.199 0.013   
  1. All measures of habitat use were based on global position system (GPS) telemetry data and relate to a habitat patch (HP) scale of a 30 m pixel (900 m2).